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Frequently Asked Questions

If you have other questions or comments about TYREPLUS or any tyre or mechanical services related to your vehicle please click here to contact us directly.

  • How Do I Read a Tyre's Sidewall?

    Tyre Brand
    This is the brand or manufacturer of your tyre. 

    Brand 

    Tyre Pattern Name
    The tyre pattern name is the model or name designated to a particular tyre - this information is usually found after the manufacturer's name on the sidewall.

    Model

     

    Tyre Type 
    This designates the type of vehicle the tyre fits. P is for passenger metric. Other letters are LT (for light truck), T (for temporary spare) and ST (for special trailers). If your tyre has no letter, it signifies that your tyre is a euro "metric" size.

    Type

    Tyre Width
    The width of your tyre from sidewall to sidewall. In this example the width of the tyre is 225mm. 

    Width

    Tyre Aspect Ratio
    This identifies the tyre's aspect ratio, which is the relationship of the tyre's sidewall height to the tyre's width. In this example, the sidewall height of the tyre is 55% of its width. The lower the ratio, the smaller the sidewall height, which means better cornering, but a rougher ride.

    Aspect

    Tyre Construction
    This is the tyre's internal construction, which is "radial." Almost every tyre on the road has radial construction, which means the cords of the carcass plies inside the tyre "radiate" directly across from one side of the tyre to the other. Other letters used are D, for diagonal construction, and B, for belted.

    Construction

     

    Wheel Diameter 
    This number (in inches) indicates that the tyre is designed to fit on a wheel with a 18-inch diameter.

    Picture2 

    Load Index
    This indicates how much weight the tyre is certified to carry at maximum safe inflation. Normally tyres can carry between 60 (250 kg/tyre) to 110 (1060 kg/tyre).

    Load

    Speed Rating
    This indicates the maximum safe speed at which a tyre is certified to travel under specified conditions. Speed ratings range from A (the lowest) to Y (the highest).

    Speed

  • What's the right tyre for my car?

    The Right Tyre For Your Car
    Your correct tyre size and tyre pressure can be found in your vehicle’s owners’ manual in the glove compartment or on the OEM sticker on your driver’s side door.

    Tyre Size
    OEM stands for Original Equipment Manufacturer. Quite simply, these are the tyre specs that originally came with your vehicle, according to the manufacturer's specifications and requirements. It includes the tyre size, rim size, the aspect ratio etc.

    Placard

  • What's the right tyre pressure for my car?

    Tyre Pressure
    The correct tyre pressure to inflate your tyres can be located on the vehicle or tyre placard or Vehicle Owners Manual and is the proper tyre pressure to maintain, so your tyres can give you maximum performance, including mileage and tread life.

    For proper results, make sure your tyres haven’t been driven for three hours before you check for air pressure. (Friction creates heat, which increases tyre pressure and gives improper readings.) Be aware that the air pressure displayed on the tyre sidewall is the maximum pressure, not the recommended tyre pressure. 

    Pressure Plack

  • MICHELIN Tyres Warranty

    MICHELIN promises to deliver the very best. With over a century of designing tyres, we back that promise. Our tyres are made to meticulous quality standards. That’s why every tyre designed and manufactured by MICHELIN, is warranted by MICHELIN. Discover the MICHELIN six-year warranty today.

    What's covered and for how long?
    MICHELIN Passenger Car and Light Truck tyres, used in normal service and in accordance with the maintenance recommendations and safety warnings of MICHELIN, are covered by a warranty against defects in design, workmanship and materials subject to the conditions set out below. The warranty shall be for the life of the original usable tread pattern or six years from the date of manufacture, whichever comes first.

    At the end of the six-year period no warranties and guarantees express or implied will continue to apply, to the extent permitted by law.

    The original usable tread pattern is the original pattern down to the level of the tread pattern wear indicators – 1.6mm of tread pattern remaining. Date of purchase is documented by new vehicle registration (where the tyres were fitted on a new vehicle) or original tyre sales invoice. If there is no proof of purchase, the warranty will be based on the date of manufacture.

    What's not covered
    Tyres which become unserviceable under the following circumstances are not covered by this warranty:

    - road hazard injury (e.g. a cut, snag, bruise, impact damage or puncture, whether repairable or not);

    - incorrect mounting of the tyre, tyre/wheel imbalance or improper repair;

    - under-inflation, over-inflation, improper maintenance or other abuse;

    - mechanical irregularity in the vehicle such as wheel misalignment resulting in uneven or rapid wear;

    - tyres fitted to or used with incompatible or improper valves, rims or wheels;

    - vehicles which are carrying loads or running at speeds higher than the load and speed index marked on the tyre sidewalls or that recommended for the vehicles;

    - tyre purchased second hand;

    - improper storage;

    - tyres which have not been fitted or used in accordance with the technical recommendations of the manufacturer as published from time to time;

    - accident, fire, chemical explosion, tyre alteration or vandalism;

    - tyre purchased from unauthorised dealers;

    - and climatic or ozone effects 

    Conditions & Exclusions
    Where the tyre becomes unserviceable due to a condition within the terms of this warranty, MICHELIN may at its option repair the tyre, supply an equivalent tyre as replacement, reimburse the value of the tyre based on the remaining tread depth or offer such other form of compensation according to its prevailing commercial policy.

    This warranty does not provide compensation for service charges incurred, charges for mounting and balancing, loss of time, loss of use of vehicle, inconvenience or consequential damage insofar as the law permits.

    Tyres presented to an authorised MICHELIN Dealer for compensation remain the property of the consumer and MICHELIN accepts no responsibility for loss of or damage to tyres which are in the custody or control of an authorised MICHELIN Dealer for the purposes of inspection.  Tyres accepted by an authorised MICHELIN Dealer for compensation become the property of MICHELIN.  In the event of a dispute, the consumer must make the tyre available for further inspection.

    No authorised MICHELIN Dealer, representative or employee has the authority to make or imply any representation, promise or agreement that in any way varies the terms of this warranty.  Except as expressly provide for in this warranty, all other implied warranty, guarantee, representation, promise or agreement and liability arising from breach of the foregoing are excluded to the extent permitted by law.

    THIS WARRANTY APPLIES ONLY IN AUSTRALIA.

  • BFGoodrich 4x4 Tyres Warranty

    BFGoodrich promises to deliver the very best. And with over a century of designing tyres, we back that promise. Our tyres are made to meticulous quality standards. That' why every tyre designed and manufactured by BFGoodrich is warranted by us.

    What's Covered 
    All BFGoodrich tyres used in normal service and in accordance with the maintenance recommendations and safety warnings of the BFGoodrich company are covered by a warranty against defects in design, workmanship and materials subject to these conditions:

    - The warranty shall be for the life of the original usable tread pattern or six years from the date of purchase, whichever comes first.

    - Date of purchase is documented by new vehicle registration (where the tyres were fitted on a new vehicle) or original tyre sales invoice. If there is no proof of purchase, the warranty will be based on the date of manufacture.

    - The warranty period of 6 years from date of purchase is limited to a maximum tyre age of 9 years from the date of manufacture.

    - At the end of the relevant periods stated in the paragraphs above, all warranties, express or implied are terminated.

    - The original usable tread pattern is the original pattern down to the level of the tread pattern wear indicators - 1.6mm of tread pattern remaining.

    What's Not Covered
    Tyres which become unserviceable under the following circumstances are not covered by this warranty:

    - Road hazard injury (e.g. a cut, snag, bruise, impact damage or puncture, whether repairable or not)

    - Incorrect mounting of the tyre, tyre/wheel imbalance or improper repair

    - Under-inflation, over-inflation, improper maintenance or other abuse

    - Mechanical irregularity in the vehicle such as wheel misalignment resulting in uneven or rapid wear

    - Tyres fitted to or used with incompatible or improper valves, rims or wheels

    - Vehicles which are carrying loads or running at speeds higher than the load and speed index marked on the tyre sidewalls

    - Tyres purchased second hand

    - Improper storage

    - Tyres which have not been fitted or used in accordance with the technical recommendations of the manufacturer as published from time to time

    - Accident, fire, chemical explosion, tyre alteration or vandalism

    - Climatic or ozone effects

    - Tyres purchased from any entity not authorised by BFGoodrich

    - Tyres purchased from the website of any entity not authorised by BFGoodrich

    - Tyres which become unserviceable under the following circumstances are not covered by this warranty:

    - Road hazard injury (e.g. a cut, snag, bruise, impact damage or puncture, whether repairable or not)

    - Incorrect mounting of the tyre, tyre/wheel imbalance or improper repair

    - Under-inflation, over-inflation, improper maintenance or other abuse

    - Mechanical irregularity in the vehicle such as wheel misalignment resulting in uneven or rapid wear

    - Tyres fitted to or used with incompatible or improper valves, rims or wheels

    - Vehicles which are carrying loads or running at speeds higher than the load and speed index marked on the tyre sidewalls

    - Tyres purchased from any entity not authorised by BFGoodrich

    - Tyres purchased from the website of any entity not authorised by BFGoodrich 

  • My tyre has gone flat. Is this covered by warranty?

    There may be a circumstance where air loss can be covered by warranty, however, this can only be determined when inspected by a tyre professional at an authorised TYREPLUS dealer.

    Some common causes of sudden or slow air loss that are not covered by warranty are:

    - Road hazard injuries (punctures, cuts, impact damage to the liner, ply material or sidewall rubber)

    - Valve stem or core air loss form damage, loose or aged rubber stem

    - Air loss from the bead seating area (corrosive build-up on the wheels which prevents a proper seal between the wheel flange and the tyre beads, bead seating area damage from accidental mounting or dismounting, foreign material between the rim flange area and the tyre bead seating area, bent rim flange).

  • Are punctures and cuts covered by warranty?

    Our warranty covers defects in workmanship and material for the life of the tread or 6 years, whichever comes first. We do not cover tyres that are damaged as a result of road hazards, cuts, punctures, impact, etc.

  • I don't understand the language they speak at the tyre dealer - Tyre Glossary

    Tyres are more than just black and round. Much more. They utilise an innovative mix of chemistry, physics and engineering.

    Many people don't understand the terminology when they enter a tyre dealer or a mechanical workshop - below is a list of industry terms to help you.

    Air Pressure
    The amount of air inside the tyre pressing outward on each square inch of tyre, which is expressed in pounds per square inch (psi) or kiloPascals (kPa), the metric designation for air pressure. Airtight Synthetic Rubber

    Formulated with virtually impermeable butyl rubber, this material replaces the inner tube in modern, tubeless tyres. Check you air pressure monthly, as some air loss occurs over time.

    Alignment
    When all wheels on the vehicle are adjusted so that they are pointed in the optimum direction relative to the road and each other.

    All-season high-performance tyres
    Tyres that deliver a measure of traction on snow and ice without sacrificing dry performance driving capabilities.

    All-season tyres
    Tyres that provide a good balance of traction in rain or snow with good tread life and a comfortable, quiet ride.

    All-season traction
    Indicates the tyre's ability to provide a balance of traction in wet, dry, and winter conditions.

    APS
    An advanced silica-based winter rubber compound that helps provide flexibility where the tread surface makes contact with the road.

    Aquaplaning
    An extremely dangerous situation where water builds up in front of the tyres resulting in the tyres losing contact with the road surface. At this point, the vehicle is skimming on the water surface and is completely out of control. Also called hydroplaning.

    Aramid
    A synthetic fabric used in some tyres that is (pound-for-pound) stronger than steel.

    Aspect Ratio
    The relationship of a tyre's sidewall height to its section width.

    Balance/Imbalance
    The state in which a tyre and wheel spin with all their weight distributed equally. To correct an imbalance, a trained mechanic will add weights on the interior or exterior of the wheel.

    Bead
    The section of the tyre that sits on the wheel. Inside, there is a round hoop of steel wires, wrapped or reinforced by body ply cords, that clamps the tyre firmly against the wheel rim.

    Bead Chafer
    A key component of the tyre that is the contact point between the tyre and the wheel, designed to withstand forces the wheel puts on the tyre during mounting as well as the dynamic forces of driving and braking. 

    Bead Filler
    Responsible for transferring propulsion and braking torque from the wheel rim to the road surface contact area.

    Bead Tension Structure
    Two sidewall plies wrapped around each bead wire in opposite directions providing lateral stability but flex to absorb road irregularities.

    Belt
    A rubber-coated layer of cords that is located between the body plies and the tread. Cords are most commonly made from steel but may also be made from fiberglass, rayon, nylon, polyester or other fabrics.

    Bias-Ply
    A type of tyre with crossed layers of ply cord running diagonally to the center line of the tread.

    Bolt Circle
    The diameter of an imaginary circle drawn through the center of each lug nut hole and then measured from two holes that are directly across from each other. The measurement is used in selecting the proper wheel for replacement.

    Braking Torque
    A technique practiced by drag racers and road testers to improve their off-the-line acceleration; applying the brake and throttle at the same time, increasing the engine rpm until release of the brake.

    Breakaway
    A term used to describe a loss of traction when negotiating a curve or when accelerating from a standing start. The tyres slide against, instead of grip, the road surface.

    Butyl Rubber
    Synthetic rubber used to create today's tyres. It is virtually impenetrable to water and air.

    Camber
    A wheel's inward or outward tilt from vertical, measured in degrees. The camber angle is adjusted to keep the outside tyres flat on the ground during a turn.

    Camber Thrust
    Side or lateral force generated when a tyre rolls with camber, which can add to or subtract from the side force a tyre generates.

    Carbon Black
    This is a reinforcing filler which, when incorporated into the tyre rubber compound, gives it a high resistance to wear.

    Carcass
    The supporting structure of the tyre consisting of plies anchored to the bead on one side and running in a radius to the other side and anchoring to the bead. Also called casing.

    Carcass Ply
    Made up of thin textile fiber cables bonded into the rubber. These cables are largely responsible for determining the strength of the tyre.

    Carrying Capacity
    At a given air pressure, how much weight each tyre is designed to carry. For each tyre size, there is a load inflation table to ensure the inflation pressure used is sufficient for the vehicle axle load.

    Caster
    The angle between a line drawn vertically through a wheel's centerline and the axis around which the wheel is steered; improves a car's directional stability and on-center feel.

    Centerline
    An imaginary line down the center of the vehicle. Alignment tracking is measured from this line.

    Centrifugal Force
    The sideways acceleration, measured in g's, of an object in curvilinear motion. As a car traverses a curve, centrifugal force acts on it and tries to pull it outward. To counteract this, the tyres develop an equal and opposite force acting against the road. Also called lateral force.

    Cold Inflation Pressure
    The amount of air pressure in a tyre, measured in pounds per square inch (psi) before a tyre has built up heat from driving.

    Contact Patch
    The area in which the tyre is in contact with the road surface. Also called footprint.

    Cord
    The strands of fabric forming the plies or layers of the tyre. Cords may be made from polyester, rayon, nylon, fiberglass or steel.

    Cornering Force
    The force on a turning vehicle's tyres - the tyre's ability to grip and resist side force - that keeps the vehicle on the desired arc.

    Crown Plies
    Provide the rigid base for the tread which allows for good fuel economy. The plies also provide centrifugal and lateral rigidity to the tyre, and are designed to flex sufficiently for a comfortable ride.

    Curb Weight
    Weight of a production vehicle with fluid reservoirs (including fuel tank) full and all normal equipment in place, but without driver or passengers.

    Deflection
    The tread and sidewall flexing where the tread comes into contact with the road.

    Directional Stability
    The ability of a vehicle to be driven safely and with confidence in a straight line and at high speed without being affected by pavement irregularities, crosswinds, aerodynamic lifting forces, or other external influences.

    Dog Tracking
    Track is the width between the outside tread edges of tyres on the same axle. Tracking, or more specifically "Dog Tracking", refers to a condition in which the vehicle is out of alignment, and the rear wheels do not follow in the path of the front wheels when the vehicle is traveling in a straight line. Also called tracking.

    DOT Markings
    A code molded into the sidewall of a tyre signifying that the tyre complies with U.S. Department of Transportation motor vehicle safety standards.

    Drift
    Drift refers to a vehicle deviating from a straight-line path when no steering input is given. Also called pull.

    Eccentric Mounting
    Mounting of a tyre wheel assembly in such a way that the center of rotation for the assembly is not aligned with the center of rotation for the vehicle's hub.

    Filament at Zero
    Individual, spiral-wrapped nylon or aramid/nylon reinforcing filaments can be precisely placed in specific portions or across the entyre tread area atop the steel belts banded at zero degrees. Not only does this help retain tyre shape, but it also enhances ride quality and steering precision.

    Fore-and-Aft Weight Transfer
    Transfer of weight from the front axle to the rear axle (or vice versa) caused by acceleration or braking. Acceleration causes weight transfer from the front axle to the rear axle. Braking causes weight transfer from the rear axle to the front axle.

    Four-wheel-drift
    A handling term describing a car with its front and rear tyres sliding in a controlled manner. The driver uses both throttle and steering to keep the vehicle on a prescribed path.

    Free Radius
    The radius of the tyre/wheel assembly that is not deflected under load.

    Groove
    The space between two adjacent tread ribs; also called tread grooves.

    Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR)
    The maximum weight that can be distributed among the tyres on a given axle.

    Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW)
    The weight of the vehicle and its contents (fluids, passengers, and cargo).

    Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR)
    The maximum weight allowed for the vehicle and its contents. This value is established by the vehicle manufacturer and can be identified on the vehicle door placard.

    Indentation
    A normal, safe occurrence in a tyre's sidewall where overlapping splices of fabric cords form indentations. This cannot occur on tread due to steel cable implantation.

    Inflation
    The act of putting air into tyres.

    Inner liner
    The innermost layer of a tubeless tyre, compounded with virtually impermeable butyl rubber. Some air loss over time will occur. Check your pressures monthly to ensure safe reliable operation of your tyres.

    Kilopascal (kPa)
    The metric unit for air pressure. One psi is equal to 6.9 kPa.

    Lateral weight transfer
    When a vehicle travels through a curve, weight is transferred from the wheels on the inside of the curve to the wheels on the outside of the curve. This is a result of the centrifugal force, or lateral force acting on the vehicle.

    Load-carrying capacity
    Indicates how much weight a tyre is certified to carry at maximum inflation pressure.

    Loaded radius
    The measurement in inches from the wheel axle centerline to the ground when the tyre is properly inflated for the load.

    Loaded section height
    The height of the section of the tyre that is making contact with the road.

    Load index
    An assigned number ranging from 0 to 279 that corresponds to the load-carrying capacity of a tyre.

    Load range
    Defines a range of maximum loads that tyres can carry at a defined pressure.

    Lug-centric
    Wheels are manufactured to fit either the hub or the lugs. Lug-centric is matching the lug holes of a custom wheel perfectly to the lug pattern of the vehicle.
    Luxury performance touring tyres

    Generally designed for luxury sedans, this breed of tyres blends performance handling with a comfortable, smooth ride.

    Maximum inflation pressure
    The maximum air pressure to which a cold tyre may be inflated; can be found molded onto the sidewall.

    Mounting
    This is the act of putting a tyre on a wheel and ensuring that the assembly is balanced. When you purchase new tyres, they need to be professionally mounted. It is also standard for the tyre dealer to charge a nominal fee for a valve stem.

    Overall diameter
    The diameter of the inflated tyre, without any load.

    Overall width
    The distance between the outside of the two sidewalls, including lettering and designs.

    Overinflation
    Too much air in the tyre, resulting in premature wear in the center of the tread.

    Oversteer
    The tendency for a vehicle, when negotiating a corner, to turn more sharply than the driver intends. The rear end of the vehicle wants to swing toward the outside of a turn. A handling condition in which the slip angles of the rear tyres are greater than the slip angles of the front tyres. An oversteering car is sometimes said to be "loose," because its tail tends to swing wide.

    Oxidation
    Rust process that takes place in the steel belts when moisture, via damage, is allowed to get inside the tyre. This can result in the tyre becoming unserviceable before normal replacement time.

    PSI
    Abbreviation for pounds per square inch, which is the automotive industry's measurement of the pressure in a tyre.

    Pull
    A condition in which a vehicle swerves to one side without being steered in that direction, as a result of irregular tyre wear, improper front and/or rear wheel alignment, or worn or improperly adjusted brakes.

    Rim
    That portion of a wheel to which a tyre is mounted.

    Rim diameter
    The diameter of the rim bead seats supporting the tyre.

    Rolling circumference
    The linear distance traveled by a tyre in one revolution (its circumference). This can vary with load and inflation. Rolling circumference can be calculated as follows: 63,360 divided by revolutions per mile = rolling circumference in inches.

    Rolling resistance
    The force required to keep a tyre moving at a uniform speed. The lower the rolling resistance, the less energy needed to keep a tyre moving.

    Rotation
    The changing of tyres from front to rear or from side to side on a vehicle according to a set pattern; provides even treadwear. Rotating your tyres on a regular basis (every 6,000-8,000 miles) is a simple way to add miles to their life. See your tyre warranty for more information on recommended rotation.

    Rubber compound
    A combination of raw materials blended according to carefully developed procedures. The rubber compound is specially adapted to the performance required of each type of tyre.

    Run Flat Technology
    Tyres that are designed to resist the effects of deflation when punctured, and to enable the vehicle to continue to be driven at reduced speeds and for limited distances.

    Shoulder
    The area of a tyre where the tread and sidewall meet.

    Sipes
    Special slits within a tread block that open as the tyre rolls into the contact patch then close, breaking the water tension on the road surface and putting rubber in contact with the road to maintain adhesion, increasing wet and snow traction.

    Size
    The combination of tyre width, construction type, aspect ratio, and rim size used in differentiating tyres.

    Steel belt
    The combination of steel cords covered with rubber that forms a strip or belt placed under the tread rubber and on top of the casing (carcass); ensures uniformity when the tyre is rotating and helps prevent flats.

    Steering response
    A vehicle's reaction to a driver's steering inputs. Also the feedback that drivers get through the steering wheel as they make steering inputs.

    Suspension
    The various springs, shock absorbers and linkages used to suspend a vehicle's frame, body, engine, and drivetrain above its wheels.

    Symmetrical Tread Design
    Uniform tread pattern on both sides of the tread for better performance in specific conditions and on specific roads.

    Synthetic rubber
    Man-made, as opposed to natural, rubber. Most of today's passenger car and light truck tyres have a relatively small amount of natural rubber in their content.

    Tyre
    Also called pneumatic tyre, a precisely engineered assembly of rubber, chemicals, fabric, and metal, designed to provide traction, cushion road shock and carry a load under varying conditions.

    Tyre Designation
    An alphanumeric code molded into the sidewall of the tyre that describes the tyre's size, including width, aspect ratio, rim diameter, load index, and speed rating. Most designations use the P-Metric system.

    Tyre Mixing
    A situation in which tyres of various brands, types, or sizes are mixed on a vehicle. This can lead to variations in the vehicle's ride and handling characteristics.

    Tyre Placard
    A metal or paper tag permanently affixed to a vehicle, which indicates the appropriate tyre size and inflation pressures for the vehicle. The placard can ordinarily be found on either the driver's doorpost, the glove box lid, or the fuel-filler door.

    Tyre Pressure Gauge
    Tool used to properly measure the air pressure in a tyre.

    Toe
    The difference in distance between the front and rear of a pair of tyres mounted on the same axle.

    Toe-In
    The fronts of two tyres on the same axle are closer than the rears of the tyres.

    Toe-Out
    The fronts of two tyres on the same axle are further apart than the rears of the tyres.

    Toe-Out Turns
    Also known as Ackerman Angle. A vehicle's wheels on the inside of a turn follow a smaller radius than the tyres on the outside of the turn, because the two front wheels steer at different angles when turning.

    Torque
    Turning or twisting effort, usually measured in lb-ft or Newton meters.

    Torsion Bar
    A long, straight bar fastened to the frame at one end and to a suspension part at the other; acts like an uncoiled spring that absorbs energy by twisting.

    Traction
    The friction between the tyres and the road surface; the amount of grip provided.

    Tread
    That portion of a tyre that comes into contact with the road. It is distinguished by the design of its ribs and grooves. Provides traction in a variety of conditions, withstands high forces, and resists wear, abrasion, and heat.

    Tread Depth
    The depth of usable tread rubber measured in 32nds of an inch. If a tyre comes new with 10/32nds of rubber, you have 8/32nds of usable rubber. Tyres must be replaced when the wear bars are visible at 2/32nds.

    Tread Life
    The life of a tyre before it is pulled from service; mileage.

    Underinflation
    Operating a tyre without sufficient air pressure to support the weight of the vehicle with occupants and additional load; could cause failure of the tyre when heat is generated inside the tyre to the point of degeneration of components.

    Understeer
    The handling characteristic in which the front tyres break loose because they are running a larger slip angle than the rear tyres. Also known as plowing.

    Undertread
    Material between the bottom of the tread rubber and the top layer of steel belts; acts as a cushion that enhances comfort.

    Valve
    A device that lets air in or out of a tyre. It is fitted with a valve cap to keep out dirt and moisture, plus a valve core to prevent air from escaping.

    Variable Contact Patch
    A system that maximizes the contact patch area during cornering through a combination of asymmetrical tread patterns and underlying belts.

    Wheelbase
    The longitudinal distance from the center of the front wheel to the center of the rear wheel on the same side of the vehicle.

  • Why are my tyres wearing out so fast?

    Treadwear or life expectancy is determined by many factors:

    - Driving habits and style of driving, geographical location, type of vehicle, type of tyre, how vehicle is maintained, how tyres are maintained, etc.

    - As a result, mileage expectancy is impossible to determine.

    - Our Limited Warranty covers defects in workmanship and material for the life of the tread or 6 years from the original date of purchase, whichever occurs first. We offer no mileage warranty on the tyres that were originally equipped on your vehicle.

    - We suggest that you have the tyres/vehicle inspected by a TYREPLUS Dealer or auto mechanic in your area to determine if there is perhaps a mechanical or maintenance issue that could be contributing to a rapid or irregular wear pattern.

  • What should I do if I notice vibration?

    Vibration is an indication that your car has a problem that needs attention. The tyres, steering system and suspension system should be checked to help determine the possible cause and correction of the vibration. If left unattended, the vibration could cause excessive tyre and suspension wear. It could even be dangerous. Our Authorised Dealers can offer you expert diagnosis and repair.

  • There's a bubble or a bulge on the side of my tyre, what should i do?

    A bulge or bubble in the sidewall is sometimes the result of damage from coming in contact with a curb, pothole or other object.

    A tyre that sustains this damaged is not covered under warranty.

    If this occurs, we recommend you take your vehicle into a TYREPLUS Dealer immediately, as this could severely jeopardise the safety of your vehicle. 

  • what's causing the center of my tyre to wear more than the sides?

    When the centre tread wears faster than the adjacent tread surfaces, possible causes include over inflation for load carried, rim width too narrow, misapplication, smooth wear after spin-out, improper tyre rotation practices, aggressive acceleration or under inflation for certain tyre types, such as performance tyres.

    Please see a TYREPLUS Dealer for closer inspection. 

  • what's causing my tyre to wear unevenly?

    When the shoulder of the tread on one side of a tyre wears faster than the adjacent tread surface, this can result from a variety of conditions, such as front and/or rear misalignment (example, toe or camber), loose or worn suspension components, hard cornering, improper tyre rotation practices, misapplication, high crown roads or non-uniform mounting.

    Please see a TYREPLUS Dealer for closer inspection. 

  • What should i do if my vehicle is pulling to one side?

    Incorrect alignment settings can adversely affect handling. Tolerable camber, caster and toe settings can be verified by a print-out from your alignment/tyre shop or vehicle dealer.

    If the tyres are evenly worn, the alignment is in order and there is still a pull, the front tyres should be criss-crossed (as long as they are not a directional tread design) to see if the pull changes directions.

    This should be performed by an authorised motor mechanic or TYREPLUS Dealer.

  • what should i do if the cords of my tyres are visible?

    Cord material may become visible at the base of tread grooves or slots due to under inflation, misalignment, loose/worn suspension components, hard cornering, improper tyre rotation practices, misapplication, high crown road or non-uniform mounting.

    If cord material is visible, the tyre must be replaced. 

  • Run Flat Tyres

    The side of the road is not a fun place. In fact, it can be dangerous. Thankfully, there’s run flat technology. Run flat tyres allow you to drive for a limited distance and reduced speed after a puncture or other event has resulted in either a drop in tyre inflation pressure or a complete loss of inflation pressure. For example, MICHELIN Zero Pressure (ZP) tyres provide run-flat technology that allows you to drive up to 80 kilometres at 80 km/h with a flat tyre.

    Never mix run flat tyres with tyres that do not have run flat technology (conventional tyres) unless in an emergency situation on a limited, temporary basis. The conventional tyre should then be replaced with a run flat tyre as soon as possible. It is not recommended to mix different run flat technologies/products.

  • Nitrogen Versus Compressed Air

    Most tyres are filled with compressed air. But some tyre retailers have started to put nitrogen into their customers’ tyres. (Nitrogen is simply dry air with the oxygen removed. Air contains nearly 79% nitrogen already.) Because nitrogen replaces oxygen, less air can escape your tyres, and your inflation pressure stays higher longer. Unfortunately, there are other possible sources of leaks (tyre/rim interface, valve, valve/rim interface and the wheel) which prevent the guarantee of pressure maintenance for individuals using air or nitrogen inflation.

    Nitrogen and compressed air CAN be mixed, if needed. Tyres manufactured by Michelin are designed to deliver their expected performance when inflated with air or nitrogen, as long as the user respects the pressures recommended by the vehicle manufacturer on the vehicle’s placard or by the tyre manufacturer.

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